how to succeed

Want to Fail? Do These 3 Things

Over the past two years, I’ve embarked on a journey to live every single day as if it’s a vacation. As you can imagine, the society in which we find ourselves doesn’t make that kind of lifestyle particularly easy to accomplish.

Every single day, I face “tradition” and try to stamp it out, opting to live by my own rules instead.

Is it easy? No. Do I fail constantly? Yes. Is it worth it? Always.

Most people I encounter want to try to live their own lives awesomely, but it’s this failure that they fear the most.

What does failure feel like?
How would my friends and family react?
Should I accept failure as a good thing?

These are the questions that hold us back from living our lives to the fullest. These are the questions that keep us stuck.

As I mentioned before, I’ve failed a ton over the past two years, but I’m somehow pulled off the life I dreamed of living. Most of my failures, though, are easily attributed to a handful of mistakes… I’d like to share them with you below.

Here’s my list of what brought me face-to-face with failure:

1. Make no new friends

Some say we are the average of the five people we surround ourselves with the most.

If you want to fail, stick closely to the people you feel most comfortable with, that don’t challenge you, and don’t motivate you to try new things.

If you do this, you’ll be sure to stay safe, stagnant, and comfortable. Nothing new means nothing to fear, right?

➜ The opposite approach: Meet as many new people as possible. Bonus points if you manage to always be the person in the room with the most to learn.

2. Spend your money on material goods

What are you if you don’t have lots of shiny stuff laying around?

You never know what may happen, so it’s best to stock up on the latest gadgets and clothes — just in case you should ever need them. There’s nothing that enhances your everyday life more than the stuff stockpiled in your closets, right?

➜ The opposite approach: Shed all the unnecessary material goods in your life, opening up room for valuable experiences instead. Bonus points if you can go a period of time without shopping for “stuff” at all, like I did.

3. Stay within your one industry

If all the greats before us specialized as carefully as possible, we should follow in their footsteps.

All that matters is diving deeper and deeper into your one industry of choice. What happens outside of that, in the rest of the world, is irrelevant to you. If you keep your brain trained in one thing, you’ll know all you need to know.

➜ The opposite approach: True creativity means creating connections between disparate industries and trends. Learn as much as you can from everyone and everything.

So, do you want to fail?

Once I moved on from making these mistakes, the doors to my “perpetual vacation” opened more quickly than I thought. I’ve learned more than I ever expected from friends I never expected, I’ve invested in amazing experiences that have granted me incredible memories., and I’ve also explored so many new industries that have contributed to my work.

In the words of Ralph Waldo Emerson:

“I am a willow of the wilderness, loving the wind that bent me.”

Not all experiences have been positive. Failure is tough, there’s no doubt about that. At the end of the day, though, avoiding these three mistakes have made my failures than much more worth it and rich.

I’d love to hear from you:

Do you think avoiding these three things could lead you to success?
What does success look like to you?

— Marcella

About the Author: When Marcella Chamorro decided to quit her job, she began living a perpetual vacation, starting her own freedom business and speaking at events worldwide. As an author & entrepreneur in Nicaragua, Marcella guides those who want to live and work awesomely — follow along here and get free resources on feeling awesome.