Tag Archives: science

7 Scientific Self Help Books that Will Transform Your Life

7 Scientific Self Help Books That Will Transform Your Life

Which is why I decided to put together this list of the 7 scientific self-help books that you can use to transform your life without worrying about whether what you’re reading is fact or fiction. r

Goals

What Animals Can Teach Us About Reaching Our Goals

You might think that the reason I chose such a title was to grab your attention but the truth is that several experiments have been conducted on animals with the purpose of discovering how the brain works and how the results can be used to improve humans life.

Many animals have similar systems to the ones we have, and by applying the results of some of the experiments done on animals to human beings have uncovered several methods of improving human life. r

Healthy Brain

Healthy Brain Habit: Get Physical Exercise

We know that exercise is good for the body, but it’s also incredibly good for the brain. As the authors of “The Sharp Brains Guide to Brain Fitness: 18 Interviews with Scientists, Practical Advice, and Product Reviews to Keep Your Brain Sharp” point out, physical exercise is one of the four pillars of brain fitness, the other three being good nutrition, stress management, and mental stimulation. Exercise gets rid of harmful stress chemicals and it boosts problem-solving, planning, and attention. Getting more exercise will help you improve your cognitive functions whether you’re a high school or college student, part of the work force, or an elderly person in retirement. r

How to Master Math and Science Learning

Longtime PickTheBrain reader Marc recently contacted me with the following request: Hi John. Just wondering if you’re going to post any articles on the importance of quantitative reasoning or perhaps tips on studying math – much like your articles on … r

Science Proves You Can Improve Your Mind

This fascinating article covers a scientific experiment on neuroplasticity — the brain’s recently discovered ability to change its structure and function, in particular by expanding or strengthening circuits that are used and by shrinking or weakening those that are rarely engaged.

In simple terms, the brain becomes stronger with training and weaker with idleness, similar to the way muscles react to exercise. In the experiment, the brain activity of Buddhist monks (who’ve spent up 10,000 hours in meditation) was compared to novice meditators. r