Tag Archives: self education

writing tips

5 Simple Ways to Instantly Improve Your Writing

Think about it: in college, professors required us to write a paper a certain length. We also felt compelled to use big, fancy words from a thesaurus to sound as smart as possible.

So what did we routinely turn in for a grade? Bloated 8-10 pagers full of words we barely knew and sentences that never once came out of our mouths.

Basically, we stopped being ourselves. r

continued education

10 Reasons to Keep Learning Once You’re Done With School

There are plenty of fabulous reasons to keep learning new things, regardless of what they are. Forming new connections in your brain doesn’t have to be difficult, though it would certainly be a good idea to make sure it was some of the time. Now, it’s time to go out there and just do it. r

learning

The Importance of Continuing Education and How to Master It

The world we live in today is busier and takes more of our attention than any of the previous generations would have ever imagined. Consider your daily responsibilities, then add the current technology to that mixture, and you are ultimately left with limited time for extracurricular activities. However, this should not deter us from extracurricular learning. r

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Reinventing Your Life with Education: The Larry Crowne Effect

In a single generation, the United States has fallen from first place to 12th in global graduation rates for young adults, and the country needs to produce 8 million more college graduates over the next decade in order to compete globally and keep up with other countries that are developing high-tech, high-skill jobs. r

education

A Revolutionary New Way to Learn Revealed

One of the best ways to make incremental progress during your other 8 hours is to learn. There are all sorts of newfangled websites that can teach you a thing or two — some with nifty videos and others with PowerPoint presentations. Call me old school, but I think one of the easiest and most economical ways to learn is by reading a book. r

writing

Truth and Secrets in Memoir Writing

When you’re nine years old, Aunt Jessie presses her powdered face to yours and whispers, “Now don’t you ever tell anyone what you saw. Your mother would just die.”

This is a scary thing to a child—to be entrusted with a secret that has so much power if could kill someone. Aunt Jessie probably didn’t mean to scare you like that, but words have power. Silence in the face of wrong has power. And when we begin to write our memoirs, we can get caught up in the webs of the past. Sometimes these webs are so tangled that we stop writing. r