momentum

5 Super Simple Ways to Build Momentum

What is momentum?

I’m going to use the same example that Darren Hardy illustrates in his book The Compound Effect (which you can read my review of here).

Darren writes about a spinning platter. The person pushing the platter has to work hard for the first couple of pushes, but afterwards it’s a lot easier due to the momentum gained.

Momentum is something that isn’t discussed much in the world of personal development, or what I’ve seen of it. I think it’s just as significant as the other ideas.

How do we get the platter spinning then?

#1 – Have a game plan

Planning doesn’t directly build momentum, but it’s important!

You want to build momentum for a specific purpose; that purpose needs a plan. If you don’t have a plan, then A) You’ll fail – or B) you’ll take a hell of a long time to complete it.

Having a game plan works wonders.

  • Action point: Identify and write down 3 habits that can be done on a daily basis in order to help you achieve your goals

#2 – Stay Consistent

Consistency is a critical component to success.

Whether you like it or not, you have to be consistent. Without consistency you’d be nowhere, and unless you won the lottery – you’d have no money.

If you’re starting up a new business, don’t work on it for 3 days in week 1, and then leave it for 4 weeks – be consistent, and be mindful of your decisions.

  • Action Point: Detect inconsistent areas of your life that you’re worried about, write them down.

#3 – Set recurring goals

As much as they sound like habits, they aren’t. Recurring goals change, yet stay the same; weird right? Let me explain.

A habit is something you do regularly without change, for example – waking up at 6am. You do it, it gets easier, and it becomes part of your life – whatever.

On the other hand, a recurring goal is something you set habitually, i.e. every week, which changes each time.

One of my recurring goals at the moment is to record 3 lectures a week for a course I’m creating. Each week I’ll write down the goal to record lectures 7-9, or 10-12. The material I’m recording is always different, unlike a habit.

Another example could be writing two articles a week. Obviously you’re not going to write the same article every week – it’s a recurring goal.

A habit may last you a lifetime, but a recurring goal shouldn’t; goals are meant to be achieved!

  • Action Point: If you haven’t got any already, write down at least 2 recurring goals that you can start working on today.

#4 – Layer habits

Habits and recurring goals are the foundation to building momentum, and layering habits is an effective way of getting where you want faster.

Now I’m not talking about creating new habits, I’m talking about adding on to your current ones. I’ve discussed this in my free 15-page guide to becoming more productive:

If one of your habits is to wake up 30 minutes earlier, then a layered habit could be to read for 15-minutes each morning, or go for a walk.

Layered habits are supposed to be simple and easy, requiring little effort. They are opportunities that come with your primary habits.

  • Action Point: Write down 2 ways you can add-on to your existing habits.

#5 – Reward Yourself

Sooooo cliché, I know. But hey, it works.

The more we reward ourselves, the more enjoyable our ride on the rollercoaster is. Constantly celebrate small successes, if you don’t have small successes – then make them.

Don’t go overboard, but make your reward enjoyable. I like to watch the odd movie or TV episode. If it’s something that you’ve been addicted to in the past (like unhealthy food), then use an alternative.

I highly doubt you’ll be in a position where you’re not having little successes along the way. If you are, then please contact me because I’d love to hear why.

  • Action Point:  Set a reward for completing several tasks (I use HabitRPG for this).

How strong is your momentum? Do you have any tips you’d like to share that you use to build momentum?

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Sam Matla blogs about achieving success through productivity and personal development at passiveproductive.com

 

 

  • http://selfstairway.com/ Vincent Nguyen

    Woo! Looks like I’m doing quite well in taking advantage of my momentum. I know it’s cliche to say, but really for me it’s all about being passionate. I’m just really wanting to do the things I do and the momentum carries through my efforts as I consciously work towards a goal(s). Great to see you on PTB, Sam!

    • http://www.passiveproductive.com/ Sam Matla

      I’m not surprised Vincent! You seem to have it together :)

      Yeah you’re damn right, it’s all about passion! I could have included that but there’s so many things that would make the list go on and on. Thanks for the comment, Vincent!

  • http://www.acalltoaction.net/ Trevor Wilson

    Excellent post Sam. Momentum is a very real effect. It happens on all fronts, from business, to health, to personal development. Whenever we start something new it will always be difficult and hard get going, but the more we stick with it, the more we focus and make it a priority, the easier and easier it becomes.

    That’s momentum.

    The work you put in early helps carry you forward as you go. So what happens when you continue to put in the work to something that’s gaining momentum?

    It accelerates.

    Most people never achieve the state of acceleration because they gave up before they ever gained any momentum in the first place. It always comes down to persistence.

    Cheers!

    • http://www.passiveproductive.com/ Sam Matla

      Hey Trevor. You’re right, all about consistency and keeping with it.

      That’s very true as well, a lot of the time people give up during the initial hard work stage, sad thing is that the momentum is just around the corner.

      Thanks for the comment!

  • http://twitter.com/GrowthGuided Growth Guided

    What do you suggest for people who have serious depression or panic issues? Anything additional to help them move forward?

    • http://www.passiveproductive.com/ Sam Matla

      I can’t speak from experience, but common sense should prevail. If someone’s depressed they should be getting professional help, it’s there for a reason.

      I have my own ideas that may possibly combat depression, but I’m not overly keen on publicly stating them. A) Because every case is different, B) I can’t speak from experience.

      I would recommend for them to make small, very small changes in their life. I told one of my friends who was depressed to wake up a little earlier every day. Little things can have a massive impact.

      BUT, a lot of people with depression and panic issues won’t have the motive to make small changes, that’s where professional help needs to come in.

      Thanks for your comment :)

    • http://nickbgoodall.com/ Nick

      That was a good, good read. I love to associate momentum with Newton’s law of inertia: “An object at rest will remain at rest unless acted on by an unbalanced force. An object in motion continues in motion with the same speed and in the same direction unless acted upon by an unbalanced force.”

      It’s the same with any success and achievement, once you get that first momentum it starts snowballing, and unless you hit some adversity you’re gonna keep on powering. If you add continuous learning on top of that, I’d call you an unstoppable force not to be reckoned with!

      Thanks Sam!

  • http://nickbgoodall.com/ Nick

    That was a good read. I love to associate momentum with Newton’s law of inertia: “An object at rest will remain at rest unless acted on by an unbalanced force. An object in motion continues in motion with the same speed and in the same direction unless acted upon by an unbalanced force.”

    It’s the same with any success and achievement, once you get that first momentum it starts snowballing, and unless you hit some adversity you’re gonna keep on powering. If you add continuous learning on top of that, I’d call you an unstoppable force not to be reckoned with!

    Thanks Sam! P.s. Sorry for the double post, screwed it up as a reply :/

    • http://www.passiveproductive.com/ Sam Matla

      Thanks for reminding me how bad I did in physics last year :P

      Unstoppable force, like a train. Brilliant! Thanks for the comment Nick :)

  • http://www.danerickson.net/ Dan Erickson

    Great points, Sam. I like staying consistent and layering, both things I do and very valuable.

    • http://www.passiveproductive.com/ Sam Matla

      Good on ya Dan! Thanks for the comment :)

  • http://www.thoughtful-self-improvement.com/Metaphors-for-Life.html Natalie

    I love this post.

    Some might think the spinning platter is just a crash waiting to happen. But it won’t crash, if you give it enough attention. When you get distracted, remember to go back and give it a little push and it will be right back on track.

    • http://www.passiveproductive.com/ Sam Matla

      That’s an interesting thought actually, another area of discussion. If you crash with lots of momentum, it hurts right? I guess it’s important to stay focused and on track, or we can get derailed, crash and burn.

      Thanks for the comment!

  • http://twitter.com/Danmoru Dan mo

    A good article,inspiring ,sounds like business planning and working on it.With the momentum,business will pick up and keep growing unless one decides otherwise.I think consistency and passion should go together and habit with discpline.

    • http://www.passiveproductive.com/ Sam Matla

      Thanks for the comment, Dan. Yes, strongly applies to business and that’s what I thought about when writing the article. You’re exactly right!

  • http://www.thebridgemaker.com/ Alex Blackwell

    Sam,

    Thanks for the ideas – and motivation. I know when I find myself struggling, if go back to staying consistent (#2) then I can re-create the habits necessary to get me to where I want to go.

    Alex

    • http://www.passiveproductive.com/ Sam Matla

      Thanks for the comment Alex!

      You’re right, consistency is the key in anything. Cheers!

  • http://thetaoofbadassinvestigator.com/ Jacky

    Ya..I agree stay consistent and set recurring goals. This is important to people to build momentum through these way. As I always used the 2 method to run my life.

    • http://www.passiveproductive.com/ Sam Matla

      Hi Jacky,

      Thanks for the comment! I really appreciate it :) I’m glad you use these methods, I’m sure you’re doing well!

  • Jeff Mcnroe

    I’m glad that I read this article. I’m amazed at the way you’ve put all the steps together. Simple enough, yet sophisticated. I’m happy that these 5 minutes which I spent reading this article were indeed, well spent!

    • http://www.passiveproductive.com/ Sam Matla

      Hi Jeff, sorry for the late reply.

      I really appreciate your comment, thanks so much for your kind words!

  • http://twitter.com/YouEverySecond Nicolas Daudin

    Thanks! I didn’t know what momentum was, although I’ve read about it on several blogs… And now i understand that so far I’ve never reached momentum … Seems that life always gets in the way, or better said, I let it get in the way. Anyway, it’s right, you’re totally right, once you start going, it’s easier to get going. You just need to be present and watch out for posible bumps on the road!

    Thanks for this article! :)

    • http://www.passiveproductive.com/ Sam Matla

      Hi Nicholas,

      Cheers for the comment! I’m glad I could help in some way or another. It’s all about just getting started really, and walking on through the storm :)